Tag: Strength Training

Advanced Powerlifting Program

Advanced Powerlifting Program

12-Week Peaking Program for Powerlifters

This is a 12-week advanced powerlifting program for peaking! So, the focus will be on peaking for your next powerlifting competition or meet! That means more sets, fewer reps, and a lot of heavy weight. But, if you can get through it, this 12-week peaking program will make you brutally strong, guaranteed!

12-Week Advanced Powerlifting Program The Thunder God (Thor), aka Reid England, putting the hammer down on a 430 pound squat! That’s a 2X Bodyweight Squat!

This Advanced Powerlifting Program is based on the Legendary Mathias Method Strength System


FACT: Your lifts suck and you know it!

If this is you, then you need to read this…

If you can’t squat 500+ lbs, bench press 400+ lbs, AND deadlift 600+ lbs RAW, then your lifts suck! It’s ok. We were all there at one point. You just need to work on your lifts before you focus on a program with this much volume. This 12-week advanced powerlifting program is great if you have a strong squat, bench press, and deadlift. However, if you are just starting out you need to build a Base Of Strength and improve your lifts first.

If you want your lifts to not suck, then you need to get our:

squat bench press deadlift powerlifting program

These one-of-a-kind squat, bench press and deadlift guides include 12-week powerlifting programs for each lift. Plus, they teach you everything you need to know about how the strongest powerlifters in the world train their lifts for maximal gain! 

First, build your lifts, then build your total!


About this Advanced Powerlifting Program

Powerlifting is a competitive strength sport that takes years of hard work and consistent dedication to become proficient at.

Lifters must constantly be working on their lifting technique and maintain that technique the best they can through the high-intensity workouts they endure. These workouts can often last hours depending on your strength level.

As you get stronger it takes more time to warm-up to your working weights and you have to constantly be adding more work through increasing the weight, sets and/or reps performed. Your workouts will often be 6-10 sets of few reps with the same weight to accumulate volume and strength over time. Numerous sets with few reps are the best way to gain maximal strength because you are practicing your setup and technique with intense weights, numerous times during a workout.

It’s All Focused on Meet Day!

Your set-up, how you perform each lift, along with everything else in this advanced 12-week powerlifting program, is focused upon obtaining the most strength for week 12. Week 12 is your competition or peak week and there should be no lifting done during the last 2-3 days leading up to your competition day. Do your training early in the week with little accessory work so that you are fully recovered before the meet.

This 12-week advanced powerlifting program will guide you through the exact work you need to do leading up to your next powerlifting competition.

Advanced Powerlifting Program Details

You will have one main power lift for each of your 3 main workout days. These main lifts are the focus of your training and need to be done without variation. As in, don’t do box squats instead of squats. Do the lifts as written. 

Workout 4 is an optional day for accessory lifts. For example, if you have a weak muscle group, then come in and train it. Use moderate intensity and volume. Do not overdo it. Save some for your main work.

Be sure to practice your lifts exactly how they are supposed to be performed in the competition. That means practicing holding deadlifts at the top and pausing bench presses as you get closer to the competition.

Intensity Sets

Also, on your main lifts, you can do an overload set to better prepare yourself for the competition. This is one set that is either an AMRAP (as many reps as possible) done with the same working weight or a daily max

Only do this if your main work was not enough and you are feeling good!

For the daily max, work up to a weight that is difficult to do for that day, but you are still able to maintain reasonable technique. Your intensity set should never be done to failure because this teaches improper technique which will decrease your maximal strength potential.

Stay focused, train hard and get stronger!


Advanced Powerlifting Program Lifting Chart

Workout 1 – Squat

Workout 2 – Bench Press

Workout 3 – Deadlift

Week Sets Reps % Max Week Sets Reps % Max Week Sets Reps % Max
1 5 5 70% 1 5 5 70% 1 5 5 70%
2 5 5 73% 2 5 5 73% 2 5 5 75%
3 5 5 75% 3 5 5 75% 3 6 4 77%
4 6 4 77% 4 6 4 77% 4 8 3 80%
5 8 3 80% 5 8 3 80% 5 7 3 83%
6 7 3 83% 6 7 3 83% 6 6 3 85%
7 6 3 85% 7 6 3 85% 7 8 2 87%
8 8 2 87% 8 8 2 87% 8 5-10 1 90%
9 5-10 1 90% 9 5-10 1 90% 9 5 2 93%
10 5 2 93% 10 5 2 93% 10 3-5 1 95%
11 3-5 1 95% 11 3-5 1 95% 11 4 5 60%
12 5 3 50% 12 5 3 50% 12
Deadlift 5 1 50%

Are you looking to build up one specific lift? Check out our Squat, Bench Press and Deadlift specific Powerlifting Programs:

  1. Squat Program

  2. Bench Press Program

  3. Deadlift Program

Get all 3 Powerlifting Programs!


Workout 1: Squat Training

500 squat

Warm-Up & Technique Work:

Pause Squat (<50%) 3 x 5

Main Lift:

Squats See Table

*Overload Set 1 x AMRAP or Daily Max

Accessory Work:

Leg Press 3-5 x 10-15

Glute-Ham Raises or Leg Curls 3-5 x 6-10

Dumbbell Curls 4 x 8-10

Weighted Plank 3 x 60-90 sec.

Mobility Work 10+ min.

*Done after your main work is complete, only on high-intensity days, and never to failure.


Workout 2: Bench Press Training

315 lb bench press

Warm-Up & Technique Work:

Pause Closegrip Bench Press (<50%) 3 x 5-10

Main Lifts:

Pause Bench Press See Table

*Overload Set 1 x AMRAP or Daily Max

Accessory Work:

Dumbbell Press 4-5 x 6-8

Military Press 3-5 x 3-8

Triceps Press Downs 5-10 x 6-10

Face Pulls 5 x 8-10

Mobility Work 10+ min.

*Done after your main work is complete, only on high-intensity days, and never to failure.


Workout 3: Deadlift Training

 

Warm-Up & Technique Work:

Conventional Deadlift (<50%) 3 x 5

Main Lift:

Deadlift See Table

*Overload Set 1 x AMRAP or Daily Max

Accessory Work:

Dumbbell Rows 4 x 6-8

Lat Pull-Downs 5 x 10-15

Hammer Curls 3 x 10-15

Side Planks or **Grip Holds 3 x 45 sec.

Mobility Work 10+ min.

 

**Hold the center (smooth part) of a deadlift barbell, or weighted bar, at your side for as long as you can to build up your grip. It is best to do this on days when you do lighter deadlifts.


Workout 4: Accessory Work (optional)

Warm-Up & Technique Work:

Shrugs 3 x 10

Closegrip Bench Press (<50%) 3 x 5-10

Main Lift:

Military Press 5 x 5

Accessory Work:

Incline Dumbbell Press 3 x 10-15

Push-Ups or Dips 3 x Failure

Dumbbell Triceps Extensions 3 x 10-15

Reverse Flyes 3 x 10-20

Lateral Raises 3 x 10-15

***Rotary Cuff Work – x 100 total

Side Bends 3 x 10-20

Weighted Crunches 5 x 10

Mobility Work 10+ min.

 

***Do slow, controlled motions with a cable that works on the rotation of your humerus (upper arm bone). See examples HERE.

 


Let us know if you liked this 12-week advanced powerlifting program! Also, check out our other strength programs like our Powerlifting for Mass: Hypertrophy Program and our Powerlifting Power: Dynamic Training Program!

Advertisements

20 Gym Etiquette Rules Everyone Needs To Know

Gym Etiquette Rules Everyone Needs To Know

Gym etiquette. It is a must-have for all gym-goers. Whether you workout anywhere from 24-Hour Fitness to your local CrossFit or an Old-School Powerlifting Gym, these are the things you need to know. Simply follow these basic gym etiquette rules, or risk getting kicked out and losing your gym membership. Or worse, becoming the local gym idiot! 

If you disagree with any of these gym etiquette rules or have some to add, comment below! 

Also, if you have any funny gym fail stories to tell, please leave them here.


What is Gym Etiquette?

Gym etiquette is how you conduct yourself in a gym style environment. Whether others are around or not, it is important you conduct yourself in a respectful manner. For this to occur, gyms have their own set of gym rules. However, there is more to it than just following the rules set in place for you to keep your membership.

In the following, we will go over all the proper gym etiquette you need in order to avoid becoming the local gym idiot.

Note: Every gym has their own set of rules and guidelines to follow. So make sure to check in with them to avoid the Lunk Alarm or any unnecessary fees.


Top 5 Gym Rules

Gym Etiquette Rule #1: Pay your dues!

This is by far Gym Etiquette Rule #1! Both financially and respectfully, you need to pay your dues. Nobody likes a cheapskate or a cocky amateur that think they know it all. Nobody cares how many magazines you’ve read, celebrities you’ve met, or videos you’ve watched. Stay up to date on your fees and learn from those with more experience, even if they are younger than you.

Overall, just don’t be an A$$! Be kind, humble and respectful to everyone at all training levels. Make sure to encourage others and make friends.

Remember, there is ALWAYS someone bigger, stronger, and better looking than you. Failure to comply to this standard Gym Etiquette Rule #1 can easily result in the termination of your gym membership! Or you getting physically thrown out of the gym by 1+ angry gym members!

Gym Etiquette Rule #2: RE-RACK YOUR WEIGHTS!!!

The most disrespectful, discourteous, and infuriating thing you can do in a gym is leave your weights out, or put them away wrong. Whether it be dumbbells, plates, kettlebells, or other gym equipment, put everything back the way it is supposed to be. Even if that is not how you found it!

We are pretty sure your mom doesn’t follow you around at the gym, so you are gonna have to take some responsibility and clean up after yourself. Otherwise, you will lose the respect of everyone around you and become the real gym idiot that everyone hates!

Gym Etiquette Rule #3: ALWAYS ask, don’t just assume.

When you assume things you simply make an “a$$” our of “u” and “me”. If anyone is nearby, or could possibly be using something, always ask before you take it. Even if you need to wait a minute to see if anyone comes back to it.

Taking things is just rude, even if you “didn’t know”. If you ask, you always know.

Remember, everyone shares everything at the gym, the same as it is in kindergarten. If you want something, then check around before taking it. Then there are no unnecessary arguments or angry looks.

Gym Etiquette Rule #4: Don’t hog the equipment.

When it comes to using the equipment, get in and get out. Don’t sit there on a machine or bench scrolling through Instagram for 5 minutes between every set. People are always waiting from a distance.

Be courteous of other people’s time, and follow social media on your own time. And if you have 5+ sets to do, you better not just be standing around at the squat rack talking to your gym bros. Always be working, or getting ready for the next set.

If you are doing a superset, be quick about it and never use more than 2-3 machines or stations at once, unless the gym is empty. Everyone has stuff to do too.

Gym Etiquette Rule #5: Respect personal space!

Look, but don’t touch. Big arms, ripped abs, and huge legs are all admirable. However, just because we like when people notice, doesn’t mean that you have the right to come up and touch what we have built.

If you want to feel, ASK! No acceptions! Whether you are young and hot or old and creepy, stay out of our personal space unless invited in.


Top 10 Gym Etiquette Rules

Gym Etiquette Rule #6: Don’t smell.

Whether you smell good or bad, the gym is not the place to give it away. You should come in not smelling like anything, good or bad. Bad smells only get worse, and good smells are too fragrant for others around you not to be distracted. It is fine if you start to stink after you have been sweating for a while but come in fresh, not freaky.

Also, if you smell like you just came out of a hotbox of smoke in your car, people are going to hate you. Whether you think you don’t smell like smoke or not, you do, and everyone knows it. It is your right to do as you wish, however, everyone at the gym is sharing air. If you ruin their air, you can expect a lot of dirty looks and even a canceled gym membership.

Gym Etiquette Rule #7: NO SINGING!

It is not Karaoke night! And we don’t care if it is your favorite song. Save your croaky voice for passing the time in traffic. When you’re in the gym, focus on your work.

P.S. If you can sing while working out, then you are not really working very hard. Just sayin’.

Gym Etiquette Rule #8: Scream as much as you want, but have a reason!

Being loud when getting psyched up and working hard is fine. However, if you do it for no reason, then you are just being a gym idiot.

To keep it simple, if you are doing something cool, then you are fine. If not, then stay quiet.

Gym Etiquette Rule #9: Wipe down your equipment. No excuses.

This is a mojor health risk if you forget, so don’t! Besides, “I forgot” is not a reasonable excuse for anyone old enough to workout in a gym.

Whether you sweat a lot or not, it is your courteous duty that you wipe down your equipment EVERY SINGLE TIME after you are finished using it. DON’T FORGET!

Gym Etiquette Rule #10: Don’t hit on other members!

The gym is a great place to hook up…before and after your workout though! It is NEVER a good idea to interrupt someone else’s workout. Especially if you are interested in more than a friendship!

Interact, but do not interrupt. If there is a connection, talk after. If not, they’re not interested. It is a HUGE turn off to interrupt someone’s workout. So be patient and take action when it is the appropriate time.


Top 20 Rules

Gym Etiquette Rule #11: Ask before you give help!

First, it is not social hour at your local country club, so keep your pointless talk to yourself. If you can’t say what you are going to say in under a minute, then save it for later. People go to the gym to better themselves and are all on a time crunch. Be respectful of their time and save the chat about the weather for the inevitable awkward silences in your life. 

Secondly, NEVER walk up to someone to give them tips about how they “should” be doing things. That is extremely disrespectful, as it shows you think they have no idea what they are doing. If you have a suggestion, then ask if they would like to hear it. Don’t just start spewing out advice that they may not even want. Usually if they want advice, they’ll ask.

Gym Etiquette Rule #12: Wear appropriate gym attire!

It is not a strip club (male or female). So fully cover up all inappropriate areas. Ladies, side boob and see-through are too much, but a reasonable sports bra and short shorts are fine. Men, a speedo is for the pool, and your package is not made to be scrunched up into spandex.

Also, it’s not the 70s. Be comfortable, but not distracting. Taking your shirt off is fine, but don’t be loud about it. Public Indecency is a crime.

Of course, don’t track in dirt and mud from outside. If your shoes are dirty, take them off before you walk around.

Gym Etiquette Rule #13: No lockerroom nudity!

Cover yourself up in the locker room (and on the floor, obviously). There is always that one old guy in the locker room that is way too confident in his own skin, and there’s nothing we can do about that. Just don’t be that guy or gal! Keep it covered, and keep it appropriate.

Also, remember it is not social hour in there either.

Gym Etiquette Rule #14: No PDA (Public Display of Affection)!

We know that couples that workout together, stay together. However, the gym is not the place to show off your everlasting love and affection for each other. Nobody wants to see, hear, or have to workout around your makeout sessions every 2 minutes. So, stay on task, so you can get home sooner, and do what you need to do there.

Gym Etiquette Rule #15: Don’t stand in the way!

Whether you are in the walkway, at the water fountain or in front of the dumbbell rack, don’t be in the way. Make sure there is always plenty of space for people to move around you and get to what they need.

This also includes standing between benches, in or near squat racks or machines, and walking slow. Keep out of the way and no one will mind.

Gym Etiquette Rule #16: Glance, but don’t stare.

We get it. We’re hot, but that doesn’t mean we want everyone staring. Don’t be the creepy guy or gal that stares down every hotty in the gym. Everyone likes to be noticed for their hard work but don’t overdo it. Admire, and compliment if necessary, then look away.

Gym Etiquette Rule #17: Don’t laugh at anyone that is trying!

It is always okay to laugh with someone, but it is NEVER okay to laugh at someone, when at the gym. Yes, gym fails and gym fail stories are popular and funny. However, most of those people just don’t know what they are doing. So think of how you would want someone to help you if you were them. Then go from there.

Gym Etiquette Rule #18: Don’t be a gym idiot!

Don’t use bands, chains, or other equipment you don’t understand unless you know what you are doing! If you want to know why read these funny gym fail stories. If you need help, just ask.

Also, if you need a spotter, then get one. You shouldn’t make others around you concerned for your safety to where they feel the need to keep an eye on you like a child.

It is okay to ask for help, but not okay to put yourself and others at risk. Be smart, and be safe. 

If you need a help on how to get started, get one of our strength programs or learn more about the Mathias Method Strength System!

Gym Etiquette Rule #19: Don’t keep asking for free advice.

If you need a personal trainer, then get one! And pay them. You shouldn’t go around bothering other people’s workouts for every little thing. You need to figure some things out on your own and if you need a lot of help, then pay someone to help you.

It is okay to ask for tips, but not for every exercise that you do. Even in the gym, nothing is really free. Respect other people’s time and value.

Gym Etiquette Rule #20: No sleeping, eating or lounging!

The gym floor is not a lounge, so don’t use it as one. If your gym doesn’t have a place to sit and hang out, then there is probably a reason. As in, they don’t want you to hang out there forever.

Eat, sleep and wait in your car, not on the unused machines or benches. You are just going to be in the way. 


Important Reminders

It is also important to mention that things like curling in the squat rack or just using equipment for the wrong purpose are obvious no no’s. Just don’t do it.

Things like how you lift and the music you listen too are not on this list, because those things generally do not affect others.

Overall, these are the basic gym etiquette rules everyone needs to follow. However, make sure to check in with your gym’s rules so that you never get the Lunk Alarm set off on you, or have to pay fines for things you didn’t know.

Remember, if you disagree with any of these, or have some to add, comment below!

Weightlifting Warm-Up Routine

Olympic Weightlifting Warm-Up Routine

The Mathias Method Strength System emphasizes the importance of a proper warm-up before you begin any strength training routine or workout program. This is to help decrease pain, prevent injury, and fully prepare your body for the workout ahead. This page will go over our Olympic Weightlifting Warm-Up Exercises.

Get our complete How To Warm-Up Properly for Strength Training Guide today! And learn why you should NOT do cardio to warm-up before a weight training workout!


Olympic Weightlifting Warm-Up Routine Stretches and Exercises

How To Warm-Up for Weightlifting

First, do a complete full body dynamic warm-up routine before you start these Olympic Weightlifting Warm-Up exercises and stretches.

Then, the next part of the Mathias Method Strength System’s warm-up includes these workout specific warm-up exercises. These are done after your full body dynamic warm-up stretches but before your dumbbell shoulder warm-up.

This Olympic Weightlifting Warm-Up Routine will include a few specific mobility stretches for the calf-hamstring complex, hip flexors, ankles, chest, and shoulders. These will help prevent injury and increase strength as you teach your body how to move properly for strength.

When you are done with these Olympic weightlifting warm-up exercises, begin your technique work.

For all of our specific workout based warm-up routines, you can check out our How To Warm-Up Properly Guide.

More Warm-Up Exercises

See all of our Mobility Stretches or Strength Training Exercises.


Olympic Weightlifting Warm-Up Stretches

Calf-Hamstring Stretch

Reps: 30-120 seconds each side

IMG_0423

Purpose: Improve Knee Extension, Ankle Dorsi-flexion, Calf, and Hamstring Function.

  • With your knee fully extended, place the ball of your foot on a slightly raised surface and allow for your ankle to fully dorsiflex (pull your toes up towards your face).
  • Keep weight on the ball of your foot and your knee fully extended as you lean your torso forward.
  • Maintain a neutral spine and lean until you feel a stretch behind your knee.
  • Be active in the stretch by coming in and out of tension under control, contract-relax techniques and by flexing the opposing muscles (Quadriceps, Anterior Tibialis) to deepen the stretch.

Exaggerated Lunge

Reps: 30-60 seconds each side

IMG_0447

Purpose: Improve Hip Extension, Hip Flexor Function, and Hip Mobility.

  • While keeping your hips square, place one foot on a raised surface (12-20 inches high) in front of you and the other behind you.
  • Keep your front foot pointed forward and slightly internally rotate your back foot as you extend your leg behind you.
  • Keep your torso vertical, core braced and tension on your rear glute as you bend your front knee to initiate the stretch.
  • When you feel the tension in your hip flexor, hold that position.
  • To increase the stretch you can flex your glute to further press your hips forward or flex and extend your posterior knee slightly to find other tense positions to hold.

Single Leg Calf Stretch

Reps: 1-2 minutes each side

Purpose: Improve Ankle Dorsi-flexion and Calf Function.

  • With your knee fully extended, place the ball of your foot on a raised surface, high enough to feel a stretch in your calf.
  • Allow your heel to sink down as you put your weight on your foot.
  • Actively move around in this position by flexing in and out of it, forcing your knee into further extension, or pulling your toes towards your face.

Weighted Deep Squat Calf Stretch

Reps: 2-3 minutes

Purpose: Improve Ankle Dorsi-flexion and Calf Function.

 

  • While holding a barbell, place it just above your knee caps and go into a full depth squat.
  • Ensure that your heels are down in this position, and only rise slightly as you push the weight and your knees forward.
  • Move around in this position to create change, by flexing the opposing muscles and moving under control.
  • You may put more stress on one side by leaning the barbell to that side or placing all the weight on one side at a time.
  • Use this stretch sparingly as it is more intense than non-weighted mobility techniques.

Shoulder Dislocations

Reps: 10 total

Purpose: Improve Shoulder Function and Mobility.

 

  • Grasp a band, strap or light pole with a much wider than shoulder width grip.
  • Flex your glutes, brace your core and pull your shoulder blades back and down throughout the motion.
  • Starting in the front, keep your arms fully extended as you raise them in front of you, over your head and all the way around to your glutes.
  • Reverse the motion back around towards your hips.
  • Try to grasp your hands as close as you can while still maintaining the full extension of your arms.
  • Only use a grip that brings a slight stretch to be felt as you rotate about the motion.

Note: If you cannot rotate around the through the full motion then only go as far as you can and pause in this position each time.


When you finish these Olympic weightlifting warm-up exercises, begin your technique work.


All Warm-Up Routines

See all of our Mobility Stretches or Strength Training Exercises.

For all of our specific workout based warm-up routines, you can check out our How To Warm-Up Properly Guide.

how to warm-up properly for strength training book

Olympic Weightlifting Warm-Up Exercises

Upper Body Warm-Up Exercises

Upper Body Warm-Up for the Bench Press

The Mathias Method Strength System emphasizes the importance of a proper warm-up before you begin any strength training routine or workout program. This is to help decrease pain, prevent injury, and fully prepare your body for the workout ahead. This page will go over our Upper Body Warm-Up Exercises for the Bench Press.

Get our complete How To Warm-Up Properly for Strength Training Guide today! And learn why you should NOT do cardio to warm-up before a weight training workout!


Upper Body Warm-Up Exercises for the Bench Press

Bench Press Warm-Up Routine

First, do a complete full body dynamic warm-up routine before you start these Bench Press Warm-Up Exercises.

Then, the next part of the Mathias Method Strength System’s warm-up includes these workout specific warm-up exercises. These are done after your full body dynamic warm-up stretches, and before your muscle activation techniques.

This Upper Body Warm-Up Routine will include a few full range-of-motion exercises and mobility stretches for the chest, back, arms and shoulders. Together these will help prevent injury and increase strength as you teach your body how to move properly for strength.

When you are done with these upper body warm-up exercises, move onto our dumbbell shoulder warm-up exercises for the Bench Press.

For all of our specific workout based warm-up routines, you can check out our How To Warm-Up Properly Guide.

More Warm-Up Routines

See all of our Mobility Stretches or Strength Training Exercises.


Upper Body Warm-Up Exercises

Note: Yes, many of these exercises will seem and look “dorky”. However, they ALL have a purpose!

Arm Circles

Reps: x 10 each direction

Purpose: Improve Shoulder Mobility and Function.

  • With your glutes flexed, core braced and spine neutral, simply circle your arms slowly through their full range of motion in each direction.
  • Do this under control at a slow-moderate pace.
  • Keep your head in line with your torso and do not flex or extend your thoracic (upper) spine.

Horizontal Hug & Open

Reps: x 10 total

Purpose: Improve Scapular Protraction and Retraction Function and Mobility, Pectoral Function, Thoracic Spine Flexion, and Extension Mobility.IMG_2368IMG_2369

  • With your palms facing down, cross your arms in front of your body and wrap them as far around your torso as you can allowing your thoracic (upper) spine to flex forward as needed.
  • Then, reverse the motion externally rotating your hands so that your palms face up as you extend your arms horizontally to your sides and try to pull them together behind you, allowing your thoracic spine to extend backward.
  • Let your scapula protract forward as you hug and retract back to open your chest.
  • Pause at the end of each motion and switch the crossing of your arms in front each time.

Shoulder Flexion-Extension

Reps: x 10 total

Purpose: Improve Shoulder Function, and teach proper shoulder movement.

  • With your glutes flexed, core braced and arms extended, raise your hands over and behind your head as far as you can with palms facing each other.
  • Then lower your extended arms under control and internally rotate your hands to palms facing backward as you extend behind your torso.
  • Do not allow your spine to flex or extend as you go through the full range of motion.
  • Keep your shoulder blades pulled back and down as you extend behind your hips.

Single Arm Swings

Reps: x 10 each way

Purpose: Shoulder Joint Synovial Fluid Lubrication and Improve Shoulder Function.

  • With your one arm slightly flexed, circle it at a fast pace through its full range of motion each direction.
  • Be sure to cross your arm in front of your body as you swing it.
  • Go fast, but maintain control of the motion.
  • After going each direction, repeat with the other arm.

Scapular Rotations

Reps: x 10 each direction

Purpose: Improve Scapular Function and Mobility.

  • With your arms flexed about 90 degrees, circle your shoulders forward and backward through their full range of motion in both directions.
  • Ensure that your scapula is moving up and down with the motion and can move freely.

Chest Stretch

Reps: x 10-30 seconds

upper body warm up chest stretch

Purpose: Improve Pectoral and Shoulder Function and Mobility.

  • With your arms extended out horizontally, grasp a stable object with each hand.
  • Pull your shoulder blades back and down as you push your chest forward until you feel a slight stretch in your chest.
  • Breathe calmly as you relax into the stretch before starting to move through the tension under control.
  • Maintain tension in your back as you pull your shoulders back actively.

Lat Stretch- Overhand

Reps: x 10-30 seconds

Purpose: Improve Shoulder Flexion and Latimus Dorsi Function and Mobility.

  • Grasp a stable object, near your head height, with an overhand grip (palms down).
  • While maintaining a neutral spine and hips square, extend the same side leg behind you as you lean forward until you feel a stretch in your lat.
  • With your arm and leg fully extended keep a forward torso lean as you attempt to push your head through, in front of your arm.
  • Work through the tension in this position by internally and externally rotating your torso.

Note: If you can flex your arm beyond your ear, then this movement is not necessary.


Doorway Pec Minor Stretch

Reps: x 10-30 seconds

Purpose: Improve Breathing Function, Scapular Elevation, and Depression Function.

  • Standing in a doorway, flex your arms 90 degrees and place the inside of your forearms against the outer frame with your elbows shoulder height.
  • With one foot, step through the doorway until you feel a stretch in your anterior chest.
  • Take deep breaths and relax into the motion to increase the effectiveness of this stretch.
  • By leaning your torso forward you can increase the stretch towards the external rotation of your shoulder.
  • This stretch may also be done one arm at a time against any stable object.

Scapular Protraction Stretch

Reps: x 10-30 seconds

Purpose: Improve Scapular Function and Mobility.

  • With one hand, grasp a stable object at shoulder height with an overhand grip.
  • Step the same side foot back and lean away from your hand.
  • Both internally and externally rotate your entire torso, to and away from your hand allowing for your scapula to stay protracted forward.

After completing these upper body warm-up exercises for the bench press, do our Dumbbell Shoulder Warm-Up Exercises. Then you will be fully warmed up and ready to Bench BIG!


All Warm-Up Routines

See all of our Mobility Stretches or Strength Training Exercises.

For all of our specific workout based warm-up routines, you can check out our How To Warm-Up Properly Guide.

how to warm-up properly for strength training book

Bench Press Warm-Up Exercises

Lower Body Warm-Up Exercises

Lower Body Warm-Up for the Squat and Deadlift

The Mathias Method Strength System emphasizes the importance of a proper warm-up before you begin any strength training routine or workout program. This is to help decrease pain, prevent injury, and fully prepare your body for the workout ahead. This page will go over our Lower Body Warm-Up Exercises for the Squat and Deadlift.

Get our complete How To Warm-Up Properly for Strength Training Guide today! And learn why you should NOT do cardio to warm-up before any weight training workout!


Lower Body Warm-Up Exercise for the Squat and Deadlift

Squat and Deadlift Warm-Up Routine

First, do a complete full body dynamic warm-up routine before you start these Lower Body Squat and Deadlift Warm-Up Exercises.

Then, the next part of the Mathias Method Strength System’s warm-up includes these workout specific warm-up exercises. These are done after your full body dynamic warm-up stretches, and before your muscle activation techniques.

This Lower Body Warm-Up Routine will include a few full range-of-motion exercises and mobility stretches for the glutes, hamstrings, hip flexors, back, biceps, and calves. Together these will help prevent injury and increase strength as you teach your body how to move properly for strength.

When you are done with these lower body warm-up exercises, move onto our muscle activation techniques for the Squat and Deadlift.

For all of our specific workout based warm-up routines, you can check out our How To Warm-Up Properly Guide.

Other Warm-Up Routines

See all of our Mobility Stretches or Strength Training Exercises.


Lower Body Warm-Up Exercises

Note: Yes, many of these exercises will seem and look “dorky”. However, they ALL have a purpose!

Lat Stretch

Reps: 10-30 seconds

Purpose: Improve Shoulder Flexion and Latimus Dorsi Function.

  • Grasp a stable object, near your head height, with an underhand grip (palms up).
  • While maintaining a neutral spine and hips square, extend the same side leg behind you as you lean forward until you feel a stretch in your lat.
  • With your arm and leg fully extended keep a forward torso lean as you attempt to push your head through, in front of your arm.
  • Work through the tension in this position by internally and externally rotating your torso.

Note: If you can flex your arm beyond your ear then this movement is not necessary.


Bicep Stretch

Reps: 10-30 seconds

IMG_0365

Purpose: Improve Elbow and Wrist Extension, Wrist and Arm Flexor Functions.

  • Start with your fingers spread, externally rotate your hand and place your palm flat against a wall, shoulder height or below.
  • Then, initiate the stretch by leaning your bodyweight into your hand and slowly lower your body until you feel a stretch in your wrist flexors.
  • Next, turn your body away from your hand until you feel a stretch in your biceps brachii or anterior deltoid.
  • To further increase the stretch, turn your head away from your hand.
  • Move in and out of these tense positions under control while maintaining pressure against the wall.

Squat & Extend

Reps: x 3

IMG_2406IMG_2405

Purpose: Improve Hip, Knee and Ankle Joints Mobility.

  • With a shoulder width stance, raise the balls of your feet and place your fingers of each hand underneath.
  • From this position, go into a full depth squat with your knees outside of your arms.
  • Next, force your knees into extension until you feel a stretch in your hamstrings.
  • Hold each position for at least 2 seconds.

Dynamic Hamstring Stretch

Reps: 10 total steps

Purpose: Improve Hip Flexion and Hamstring Complex Function.

  • Standing erect, take a short step forward and, while maintaining a neutral spine, lean forward and reach your hands out in front of your toes until you feel a stretch in your hamstring complex.
  • Hold this stretch for 2 seconds before using your hamstrings to flex out of the stretch.
  • Then, take another short step and repeat with the other leg.

Deep Lunges

Reps: 10 total steps

Purpose: Improve Hip Extension and Hip Flexor Function.

  • Standing erect with a neutral spine and hips square.
  • Then, take a moderate-long step forward and lunge until your knee is hovering slightly over the ground or you feel a stretch in your anterior thigh.
  • Hold this position for 2 seconds before flexing out of it and stepping forward.
  • Repeat with the other leg.
  • To increase the stretch you can twist your torso towards your forward knee or laterally flex your torso with your arms overhead in the same direction.
  • Do not allow your knee to travel in front of your toes at any point.

Dynamic Pigeon Stretch

Reps: 10-30 seconds

Purpose: Improve Hip External Rotation and Glute Function

  • Find flat raised surface, between the knee and hip height.
  • Place the lateral side of your lower leg against the raised surface parallel to your shoulders.
  • Extend and internally rotate your opposite leg behind you until you feel a stretch in your glute.
  • Flex in and out of the base position by pressing your leg down against the raised surface, holding the bottom and top positions each for 2 seconds.

Note: If you feel pain in your knee, then you likely have tight peroneals (lateral calf muscles) and should free your foot by allowing it to hang off the edge of the flat surface until they are better mobilized.


Lower Body Warm-Up Exercises: Calf Mobility

Single Leg Calf Stretch

Reps: 1-2 minutes each.

Purpose: Improve Ankle Dorsi-flexion and Calf Function.

  • With your knee fully extended, place the ball of your foot on a raised surface, high enough to feel a stretch in your calf.
  • Allow your heel to sink down as you put your weight on your foot.
  • Actively move around in this position by flexing in and out of it, forcing your knee into further extension, or pulling your toes towards your face.

Weighted Deep Squat Calf Stretch

Reps: 2 minutes

Purpose: Improve Ankle Dorsi-flexion and Calf Function.

  • While holding a barbell, place it just above your knee caps and go into a full depth squat.
  • Ensure that your heels are down in this position, and only rise slightly as you push the weight and your knees forward.
  • Move around in this position to create change, by flexing the opposing muscles and moving under control.
  • You may put more stress on one side by leaning the barbell to that side or placing all the weight on one side at a time.
  • Use this stretch sparingly as it is more intense than non-weighted mobility techniques.

After completing these lower body warm-up exercises for the squat and deadlift, do our Muscle Activation Techniques. Then you will be fully warmed up and ready to Squat 500+ and Deadlift 600+!

All Warm-Up Routines

See all of our Mobility Stretches or Strength Training Exercises.

For all of our specific workout based warm-up routines, you can check out our How To Warm-Up Properly Guide.

how to warm-up properly for strength training book

lower body deadlift warm-up exercises