Self Assessment

PAR-Q & You      BMI      Waist Circumference      Waist-to-Hip Ratio      Blood Pressure      Body Fat %      VO2 Max

Print and fill out the Risk Assessment Form.


Be Healthy And Gain The

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“Your health is the most important thing,

because without it you cannot be there to help others.”


This Self Assessment Page was created to help you assess your overall health and risk factors allowing you to live a healthier life. We encourage you to do a complete assessment of yourself and work towards decreasing any risk factors you may have, so that you can set your body free from danger. We also encourage you to find things you enjoy to help motivate you as you start to change your life for the better.

  1. Assess yourself
  2. Find your motivation
  3. Go Change Your World!

Your health is the most important thing, because without it you cannot be there to help others. It must be your top priority. By not putting yourself first you will decrease your chances of being there for those you care for. It is not easy, but make your health a priority. Your health must come first! It’s the same as applying an oxygen mask during an emergency situation. You  must apply yours first, so that you will be able to help those that cannot becoming weak if you want to be there for your children’s, or grandchildren’s, birthdays, graduations, wedding, child births, and other important moments then you must first take care of yourself.

This Self Assessment Page will help you evaluate yourself to see what needs to occur for you to increase your health. Go down the list and evaluate yourself. See where you stand and know that no matter what, you CAN make it better. After assessing yourself, talk to your doctor, or a qualified healthcare professional, and start taking the necessary steps to decrease any risk factors you may have. By decreasing risk factors you greatly increase your health, and are much more likely to  live a long, healthy life in which you get to enjoy the pleasures around you. 

This page is only an assessment and cannot give specifications of how to correct all risk factors that apply to each individual. Therefore, seek consultation from your doctor, or a qualified healthcare professional, after assessment to determine the best solutions for you.

Print and fill out the Risk Assessment Form.

Note: Always consult with your doctor and have regular check up appointments. Discuss with your doctor any of the risk factors you observe here before taking any major, possibly dangerous, actions.

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ParQ and You:

**All users and participants should fill out the complete PAR-Q and You Form before beginning any of the exercises or activities presented on MathiasMethod.com, or by Mathias Method and its representatives.**

Please Print and Fill out the Complete: PAR-Q and You Form

The PAR-Q and You Form is a Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire that will help you determine whether it is safe for you to begin an exercise program, or increase your physical activity. It presents you with basic questions about yourself and instructions of what to do depending upon the answers you give. It may tell you to see your doctor before starting exercise, or may suggest that you are likely safe to begin exercising regularly.

This Form should be filled out honestly in its entirety, and suggestions followed, before increasing your physical activity.

This Form also includes a Health History Questionnaire that will evaluate your health status in more depth, and suggest whether you should begin increasing your physical activity or seek medical advice first.

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Definitions:

Mortality- refers to death caused by any health related issue such as; heart related events, illness, cancer, stroke, organ failure, or any other health related causes.

Risk Factor- refers to the increased likelihood of obtaining High Blood Pressure (Hypertension), Diabetes Mellitus (Type II Diabetes), Cancer, Heart Disease, or any health related issue leading to mortality.

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BMI (Body Mass Index)

BMI is a measurement of your weight compared to your height. It is one of the most utilized assessments to determine the stress placed on your body. It is also the best assessment to determine your risk for all cause mortality, better defined as your risk of death due to illness, disease, heart related events and other health related causes. By maintaining a healthy BMI you are more likely to live a long, healthy life.

One common mistake about BMI is that people believe it does not apply to “fit” or muscular individuals who are overweight or obese due to their large muscle mass. In fact, these individuals may be at an even higher risk because muscle tissue is vascular (with blood vessels) placing a greater stress on the heart, even though they may be “fit”. Of course, those with a large amount of adipose tissue, or fat, are also at risk, but fat tissue is not vascular so it places less direct stress on the heart. These individuals are at greater risk of obtaining Type II Diabetes Mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia and certain cancers. So whether you have a low or high body fat %, you are still in the same risk category as others within your same BMI range.

Measuring BMI:

BMI = Weight (kg)/ Height² (m)

Or

BMI = [Weight (lbs)/ 2.204 (kg)]/ [Height (inch.) X 0.0254]² 

1 kg = 2.204 lbs                   Weight in Pounds/ 2.204 = Weight in Kg

1 inch = 0.0254 cm                     Height in inches x (0.0254) = Height in meters

bmi-chart

*Risk Level is greatly increased when paired with a large waist circumference.

Referenced by: Williams, L., Wilkins. (2014). ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. American College of Sports Medicine. Ninth Edition. [Text]

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Waist Circumference:

Waist circumference is a measurement of the complete circumference (horizontal circle) around the smallest part of your abdomen, above the umbilicus (belly button) and below the xiphoid process (base tip of the sternum). This is a general measurement that shows an increased risk for illness, disease, heart related incident and other health related death based upon the amount of adipose tissue surrounding your abdominal organs. A large waist circumference has shown to greatly increase your risk of all causes of mortality, especially when paired with an obese BMI measurement. Those with a large waist circumference need to make lifestyle modifications immediately.

Standardized Measurement:

While standing with feet together, arms at sides and feet relaxed, take a horizontal (level) measurement around the narrowest part of the torso between the umbilicus (belly button) and xiphoid process (base tip of the sternum).

waist-circumference-chart

*Risk level is greatly increased when paired with an obese BMI measurement (≥30).

Referenced by: Williams, L., Wilkins. (2014). ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. American College of Sports Medicine. Ninth Edition. [Text]

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Waist to Hip Ratio:

Related to your Waist Circumference, the Waist-to-Hip Ratio further measures your risk of all cause mortality based upon your waist circumference compared to your hip circumference. This measurement assesses your body shape and shows whether you have a comparably large amount of abdominal fat that can increase your risk factors. This measurement determines whether you have a greatly increased risk or normal risk added to your other risk factors.

Waist-to-Hip Ratio = Waist circumference / Hip Circumference

Standardized Measurements:

Waist: While standing with feet together, arms at sides and feet relaxed, take a horizontal (level) measurement around the narrowest part of the torso between the umbilicus (belly button) and xiphoid process (base tip of the sternum), or immediately above the Iliac Crest (lateral hip ridges).

Hip: While standing with feet together, arms at sides and feet relaxed, take a horizontal (level) measurement around the largest part of the hips.

waist-to-hip-ratio-chart

*Risk level is greatly increased when paired with an obese BMI measurement (≥30).

Referenced by: Williams, L., Wilkins. (2014). ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. American College of Sports Medicine. Ninth Edition. [Text]

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Blood Pressure:

Blood pressure is a measure of the stress placed on your heart. This is one of the most common and useful assessment tools to determine your current health status. By having a normal blood pressure you are at a lower risk of having a stroke or heart related incident such as heart attack, heart disease, or heart arrhythmia (or irregular heart beat). A normal blood pressure shows that your heart does not have too much stress placed upon it. By having an increased blood pressure you constantly place more stress upon your heart, and are more likely to have a heart related incident. Even a slight increase in your blood pressure puts you at greater risk. As your blood pressure reaches Stage 1 Hypertensive you will be at double the normal risk and Stage 2 Hypertensive doubles that same risk putting you at 4 times the risk! This is due to blood pressure being constant, always putting that same stress on your heart. That is why doctors will be quick to give you blood pressure drugs if you have even a slightly Hypertensive Blood Pressure. This will help to protect you from dangerous heart related events. 

One of the key factors in lowering your blood pressure is exercise. Exercise helps to strengthen your heart and increase its function while assisting with weight loss. Other important factors in lower your blood pressure are decreasing your body fat % to normal ranges and obtaining a normal BMI (18.5-25). Make sure to talk to your doctor, or a qualified healthcare professional, before making any major changes and make a plan with them of how to lower your blood pressure risks.

Systolic Blood Pressure: The pressure in your arteries during contraction, measured in mmHg.

Diastolic Blood Pressure: The resting pressure in your arteries between contractions, measured in mmHg.

blood-pressure-chart

*Needs to be measured with a blood pressure cuff or device.

**Measurements taken at rest, to assess Resting Blood Pressure

Referenced by: Williams, L., Wilkins. (2014). ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. American College of Sports Medicine. Ninth Edition. [Text]

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Body Fat %:

Body Fat % is the amount of stored fat you have within your body as a percentage of your total mass, or weight. For example, a 100lb individual with 10% Body Fat has 10lbs of total stored fat within their body. This fat is within your cells, surrounding your internal organs and under your skin. Body Fat is essential for our health and survival. Without it we will begin to lose function of certain body systems and become terminally ill. Therefore it is important to maintain some body fat, but having too much can also have greatly adverse effects.

Excess Body Fat is any additional body fat that exceeds healthy ranges. This extra tissue adds stress to your body, increases your health related risk factors, and can have negative effects on your health if not managed. Increased body fat has been linked to numerous diseases, disorders and health related issues. Many of these are directly related to large Waist Circumferences and Large Waist-to-Hip Ratio, each showing large amounts of abdominal fat. If this is paired with a large BMI it is especially dangerous. If you are not within the recommended ranges of Healthy Body Fat % then you need to make lifestyle modifications as soon as possible. Talk to your doctor, or a qualified healthcare professional, for further explanation. 

Essential Body Fat is the least amount of fat we can possibly have before leading to terminal illness and death. Our body’s cannot survive without this base amount of fat. Therefore it is also very dangerous for individuals that near this base amount of fat. Only those in endurance sports or whom are in the last 4 weeks or less of aesthetic competition prep may come within 2-3% of this fat %, because they are consuming and burning off enough calories daily to be relatively safe. Those whom do not consume enough calories to maintain a healthy lifestyle will be at major risk of illness and death if nearing this body fat %. Consult with your doctor, or a qualified healthcare professional, if you have questions or concerns.

Estimating Body Fat %:

There are multiple ways to estimate your body fat %, each with their own error rating. One of the most accurate ways is through hydrostatic (underwater) weighing. This requires an experienced technician and is inconvenient for most individuals. Another closely accurate, and much more commonly used technique, is a skin fold assessment using skin fold calipers. This requires an experienced professional for relatively accurate results and should not be used for those whom are excessively fat or very thin. Even more commonly used, but fairly inaccurate, is bioelectrical impedance analysis. This is a machine that sends an electrical current through your body to estimate your body fat. This can be very inaccurate because it only measures either your upper body fat or one side of your body, depending upon the machine used. Other, easy techniques include using an online body fat % estimator that uses your personal input to estimate your body fat or using girth measurements. Online estimators can be used, but depend upon your estimation  accuracy. Girth measurements, however, are relatively accurate and easy to do. They are a great estimator of your body fat as they measure multiple areas, similar to skin fold assessments, and use different equations based upon gender and age. 

Use the following standardized measurements and equations, based upon your age and gender, to estimate your body fat:

Standardized Measurements: 

*All measurements taken in inches.

**All measurements taken on the right side of the body.

***Use an inelastic cloth tape.

  • Right Upper Arm- arm fully extended straight in front of the body. Measurement taken at the midpoint between the shoulder and elbow.
  • Right Forearm- largest part of the forearm, between the wrist and elbow, which the arm fully extended straight in front of the body.
  • Abdomen- horizontal measurement of the complete circumference of the abdomen taken one inch above the umbilicus (belly button).
  • Buttocks- standing with your feet together, take a horizontal measurement of the complete circumference around the largest part of the buttocks. 
  • Right Thigh- take a horizontal measurement of the complete circumference just below the gluteal line (buttocks).
  • Right Calf- While standing take a horizontal measurement of the complete circumference around the largest part of the calf between the knee and ankle.

*[number] = Use the bracketed numbers if you participate in at least 4 hours of vigorous exercise per week.*

Younger Women (17-26 Years Old):

% Body Fat = (Abdomen x 1.34) + (Thigh x 2.08) – (Forearm x 4.31) – 19.6 [or 22.6]

Younger Men (17-26 Years Old):

% Body Fat = (Upper Arm x 3.7) + (Abdomen x 1.31) – (Forearm x 5.43) – 10.2 [or 14.2]

Older Women (>26 Years Old):

% Body Fat = (Abdomen x 1.19) + (Thigh x 1.24) – (Calf x 1.45) – 18.4 [or 21.4]

Older Men (>26 Years Old):

% Body Fat = (Buttocks x 1.05) + (Abdomen x 0.9) – (Forearm x 3) – 15 [or 19]

*Estimation Accuracy = ±2.5-4% from Hydrostatic Weighing

Referenced by: William D. McArdle, Frank I. Katch, Victor L. Katch. (2015). Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and Human Performance. Wolters Kluwer Health. Eighth Edition. [Text]

body-fat-chart

Referenced by: Michael A. Clark, Brian G. Sutton, Scott C. Lucett. (2014). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. National Academy of Sports Medicine. Fourth Edition Revised. [Text]

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Estimating VO2 Max (Non-Exercise):

VO2 Max is the peak amount of oxygen that can be utilized by the body at one time. It is a direct measurement of Cardiorespiratory Fitness and is related to overall heart function. This measurement helps to determine how well your heart is functioning, its efficiency, and what intensity individuals should be exercising at (during cardio) for the greatest results. By determining your VO2 Max you, and your trainers, will have a better understanding of your heart health and the ability to determine your optimal exercise intensity.

A high VO2 M ax has been shown to increase lifespan and decrease sickness frequency.

To determine VO2 Max most accurately you will need to do an exercise test, with trained professionals, while being hooked up to very expensive equipment not always available to the public. You may also determine your VO2 Max relatively accurate through field tests and other measurements, however this requires some skill and measurement tools. It is recommended that fit individuals with a BMI , but this estimation can still be fairly accurate. For those with ≥30 BMI it is not always appropriate or safe to do an exercise test of any kind, depending upon their risk factors. With these individuals it is best to use the estimated VO2 Max Equation. 

For this page we will just estimate your VO2 Max through non-exercise calculations. This will give you a general, and reasonably accurate, estimate of your VO2 Max that will only require some math work. To calculate this first calculate your BMI from above. Next, determine your Physical Activity Rating (PAR) and Perceived Functional Ability (PFA):

physical-activity-rating

perceived-functional-ability-chart

Then use your calculations to determine your Estimated VO2 Max:

Estimated VO2 Max = 44.895 + (7.042 x Sex) – (0.823 x BMI) + (0.738 x PFA) + (0.688 x PAR)

Sex = 0 (Females); 1 (Males)

**Accuracy: ±3.44 VO2

vo2-max-classifications-female

vo2-max-classifications-male

Referenced by: William D. McArdle, Frank I. Katch, Victor L. Katch. (2015). Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and Human Performance. Wolters Kluwer Health. Eighth Edition. [Text]

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Disclaimer

When participating in any exercise or training program there is a possibility of physical injury. If you engage in any movements, exercises or training programs, you agree to do so at your own risk. By voluntarily participating in these activities, you assume all risk of injury to yourself and agree to release and discharge Mathias Method, Ryan Mathias and all other affiliates of any responsibility if injury occurs. In addition, by following any of the suggested guidelines, protocols, templates, activities or any other information or advice on this website (mathiasmethod.com) you do so at your own risk. Do not begin any nutrition or training program without consulting with a  Board Certified Medical Doctor and/or Registered Dietician first.

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